Cropping in post-processing acceptable or not?

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Hi everyone! Welcome to my blog where I share my passion for street photography and tips on how to improve your skills. Today I want to talk about a topic that is often debated among street photographers: is cropping in post-processing acceptable or not?

Some people might argue that cropping in post-processing is cheating, that it alters the original composition and vision of the photographer, and that it shows a lack of skill and planning. They might say that a true street photographer should be able to capture the decisive moment with the right framing and perspective, without relying on editing software to fix their mistakes.

Others might disagree and say that cropping in post-processing is a creative tool, that it allows the photographer to enhance their images and express their artistic vision, and that it shows a willingness to experiment and learn. They might say that a true street photographer should be open to new possibilities and techniques, without being constrained by rigid rules and dogmas.

So, who is right and who is wrong? Well, in my opinion, there is no definitive answer to this question. Street photography is a form of art, and art is subjective. What works for one photographer might not work for another. What appeals to one audience might not appeal to another. What matters is that you are happy with your images and that they reflect your personal style and message.

Personally, I don’t have a problem with cropping in post-processing, as long as it doesn’t change the essence and meaning of the image. Sometimes I crop my images to remove distracting elements, to improve the balance and harmony of the composition, or to emphasize the main subject or emotion. Sometimes I don’t crop my images at all, because I like them as they are. It depends on each image and what I want to achieve with it.

I think that cropping in post-processing is acceptable in street photography, as long as it is done with intention and purpose, not with laziness and carelessness. I think that cropping in post-processing is a skill that can be learned and improved, not a shortcut that can be abused and overused. I think that cropping in post-processing is a matter of personal preference and taste, not a matter of right or wrong.

What do you think? Do you crop your images in post-processing or not? Why or why not? Let me know in the comments below. And don’t forget to subscribe to my blog for more street photography content. Thanks for reading and happy shooting!

Back button AF

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Using the back button AF is a technique that allows you to focus on your subject without having to press the shutter button halfway. It involves assigning a different button on the back of your camera to activate the autofocus system, instead of using the shutter button. Normally, when you press the shutter button halfway, you activate the autofocus system and lock the focus on your subject. When you press it fully, you take the picture. However, if you move your camera after locking the focus, or if your subject moves, you may lose focus and end up with a blurry image. By using a separate button for focusing, you can avoid this problem and have more control over when and where to focus. This way, you can lock the focus on your subject and recompose the frame without losing focus. Using back button AF can be useful for situations where you want to have more control over the focus point, or when you are shooting moving subjects and want to track them continuously. Some of the benefits of using back button AF are:

  • You can avoid accidental refocusing when you press the shutter button fully.
  • You can switch between single and continuous autofocus modes without changing the settings on your camera.
  • You can prevent focus hunting when shooting in low light or low contrast scenes.
  • You can use manual focus and autofocus interchangeably without switching modes.

To use the back button AF, you need to assign a button on the back of your camera to activate the autofocus system. The exact procedure may vary depending on your camera model, but generally, you can find it in the custom functions menu. Once you have assigned the button, you need to disable the autofocus function from the shutter button. This way, the shutter button will only be used to take the picture, and the back button will be used to focus. To use the back button AF, you simply press and hold the back button to focus on your subject, and then release it when you have achieved focus. You can then recompose the frame and press the shutter button to take the picture.

Why do some photographers get noticed and others don’t.

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Why do some photographers get noticed and others don’t. What is the trick?

This is a question that many aspiring photographers ask themselves, and there is no easy answer. Photography is a creative field, and different people have different tastes and preferences. What appeals to one person may not appeal to another. However, there are some general tips that can help you improve your chances of getting noticed as a photographer.

  • Find your niche. Don’t try to copy what others are doing, but instead focus on what makes you unique and passionate. What kind of photography do you enjoy the most? What kind of stories do you want to tell with your images? What kind of style and mood do you want to create? By finding your niche, you can develop your own voice and vision as a photographer, and attract people who share your interests and values.
  • Be consistent. Once you find your niche, stick to it and be consistent in your work. This doesn’t mean you can’t experiment or try new things, but it does mean you should have a clear direction and purpose for your photography. Consistency helps you build your brand and reputation and also helps you grow as a photographer. People will recognize your work and trust your quality.
  • Be visible. If you want to get noticed, you need to put yourself out there and show your work to the world. There are many platforms and channels where you can showcase your photography, such as social media, websites, blogs, magazines, galleries, contests, etc. Choose the ones that suit your goals and audience, and be active and engaging. Share your work regularly, but also interact with other photographers and potential clients. Give feedback, ask for feedback, join communities, network, collaborate, etc. The more visible you are, the more opportunities you will have.
  • Be persistent. Getting noticed as a photographer is not easy, and it takes time and effort. You will face challenges, rejections, criticisms, and competition along the way. Don’t let that discourage you or stop you from pursuing your passion. Keep learning, improving, creating, and sharing your work. Keep trying new things and reaching out to new people. Keep believing in yourself and your vision. Eventually, you will find your audience and your success.

Restricted on face book

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My account has been restricted on FB for 2 days for displaying this picture which they say goes against FB rules

How anyone could find this image to be offensive or sexual in any way is certainly beyond me.

How do you define a street portrait?

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A street portrait is a type of photography that captures a person or a group of people in a public place, such as a street, a park, a market, or a subway station. Unlike studio portraits, street portraits are not staged or posed, but rather spontaneous and candid. They aim to capture the essence and personality of the subject, as well as the mood and atmosphere of the location.

Street portraits can be challenging but rewarding for photographers who want to explore the diversity and complexity of human life in different environments. They require a combination of technical skills, artistic vision, and social skills. Here are some tips on how to define and create your own street portraits:

  • Find your style. There is no single definition or rule for what makes a good street portrait. Some photographers prefer to shoot close-ups with shallow depth of field, while others like to include more context and background in their shots. Some photographers use flash or artificial light, while others rely on natural light and shadows. Some photographers ask for permission from their subjects, while others shoot discreetly without being noticed. You have to find your own style and preferences that suit your personality and goals.
  • Choose your location. The location of your street portrait can have a significant impact on the final result. You should look for places that have interesting people, colours, textures, patterns, or contrasts. You should also consider the lighting conditions, the time of day, and the weather. You can scout for locations beforehand or improvise on the spot. You can also revisit the same location at different times to see how it changes.
  • Approach your subject. One of the most difficult aspects of street portrait photography is approaching your subject. You have to decide whether you want to ask for permission or not, and how to do it in a respectful and friendly way. You also have to deal with possible rejections or objections from your subject or bystanders. You should always respect the privacy and dignity of your subject, and never force or harass them to pose for you. You should also be aware of the cultural and legal norms of the place you are shooting in.
  • Interact with your subject. Another challenge of street portrait photography is interacting with your subject. You have to decide how much direction or guidance you want to give them, and how to make them feel comfortable and relaxed in front of your camera. You can try to establish rapport with them by talking to them, complimenting them, or making jokes. You can also let them be themselves and capture their natural expressions and gestures. You should always be polite and grateful for their cooperation, and show them the results if possible.
  • Edit your photos. The final step of street portrait photography is editing your photos. You have to select the best shots from your session and enhance them with post-processing tools. You can adjust the exposure, contrast, colour, sharpness, cropping, and other parameters according to your taste and style. You can also apply filters or presets to create a consistent look for your street portraits. You should always keep in mind the original intention and message of your photos, and avoid over-editing them.

Ethical issues for street photographers.

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Street photography is a fascinating and rewarding genre of photography that captures candid moments of life in public spaces. However, street photography also poses some ethical challenges that require careful consideration and respect from the photographer. Here are some ethical issues for the street photographer to keep in mind:

  • Respect the privacy and dignity of the people you are photographing as much as possible. Even though you have the legal right to take photos in public spaces, you should also be mindful of how your photos might affect the people you are photographing. For example, you should avoid taking photos of people in vulnerable or embarrassing situations, such as homeless people, people with disabilities, or people who are grieving. You should also respect the wishes of people who do not want to be photographed and delete their photos if they ask you to do so.
  • Consider the power dynamics at play when taking photos. As a street photographer, you have the power to choose what to photograph, how to photograph it, and how to present it to the world. You should be aware of how your photos might reinforce or challenge stereotypes, biases, or prejudices about certain groups of people or places. You should also be aware of how your presence and actions might affect the people and environments you are photographing. For example, you should avoid being intrusive, aggressive, or disrespectful when taking photos, and you should not interfere with or endanger anyone’s safety or well-being.
  • Be culturally sensitive so as not to feed into stereotypes and biases. Street photography can be a great way to learn about and appreciate different cultures and lifestyles, but it can also be a source of misunderstanding and misrepresentation if done without cultural sensitivity. You should do some research and educate yourself about the places and people you are photographing, and try to understand their context and perspective. You should also avoid taking photos that might be considered offensive, disrespectful, or inappropriate by the local culture or norms.
  • Put the safety of the people you are photographing above the photograph. Street photography can sometimes involve taking risks or facing dangers, such as going to unfamiliar or unsafe places, encountering hostile or violent people, or breaking laws or rules. However, you should never put yourself or others in harm’s way for the sake of a photo. You should always prioritize your own safety and the safety of the people you are photographing over getting a shot. You should also be prepared for any possible consequences or repercussions of your actions.
  • Think about the risks and consequences of intrusive shooting before getting in someone‚Äôs face. Some street photographers prefer to shoot close-up and candidly, without asking for permission or notifying their subjects. This can result in striking and evocative images that capture raw emotions and expressions, but it can also result in unwanted confrontations, conflicts, or lawsuits. You should weigh the pros and cons of this approach before deciding to use it, and be ready to deal with any negative reactions or outcomes. You should also respect the personal space and boundaries of your subjects, and not invade their privacy or comfort.
  • Think about how you will use and share your photos. Street photography can have many purposes and audiences, such as artistic expression, social commentary, documentary evidence, or personal enjoyment. You should think about why you are taking photos and who you are taking them for before you use or share them. You should also consider how your photos might affect or influence others who see them. For example, you should obtain consent from your subjects if you plan to use their photos for commercial purposes, such as selling prints or licensing images. You should also respect the intellectual property rights of other photographers and not copy or steal their work.